Tuesday, September 7, 2021

MDL0040 - ORIGAMI - PYRAMID CONTAINER BY SY CHEN

MDL0040 - ORIGAMI - PYRAMID CONTAINER BY SY CHEN

Text-Only Instructions

Credits and Resources:

Diagrams and instructions for this model, and some other designs by Sy Chen can be found at http://freedomi.brinkster.net/Sy/SyDiagram.html

Videos showing the folding of this model can also be found by searching on youtube.com.

Steps 1 to 8 are instructions for the waterbomb base from

http://www.essortment.com/

Paper to be used: Square, any size; use large paper to practice with at first.

Folding level: Beginner to Intermediate

Steps: 14

Description:  This is a three-dimensional, open box or container with a characteristic pyramid shape, with its 4 sides wider at the bottom and narrowing towards the top.

It is based, in part, on the simple design of the traditional cup, but brilliantly makes use of one of the most important bases in origami, the waterbomb or balloon base.

As a box or container it is not only elegant and beautiful in its simplicity, but because of its flexible design, it can be closed using various embellishments (see Remarks below).

Remarks:

When folded, this container is open at the top, but it can be closed using tape, glue, staples, ribbon, stickers, or any embellishment of your choice, making it perfect for presenting small gifts. 

To create a gift box, insert a small gift after the model has been completed and tie a ribbon around the container, gently pulling it closed at the top.

Handles can be made by punching holes at the top of the bag and attaching ribbon, cord or yarn.

Folded from small squares, this model looks great as a Christmas decoration.

Use colors like silver, gold, red, green or blue and tie lightly with matching ribbon or punch holes on two sides and hang the containers from a tree or around the house.

Use thicker paper or thin cardboard for a sturdier mmodel.

If you are using two-sided paper, make sure that the side you want for the outside

of the container is facing down before you start to fold.

NOTE:  This model starts from the waterbomb or balloon base. If you are able to achieve

this without instructions, fold the base and then go to Step 9.

"Step 1

Place a square of paper on your work surface and position it so that the edges

are facing up and down, left and right.

Step 2

Bring the top edge down to meet the bottom edge. Crease and unfold.

Step 3

Bring the left edge over to meet the right edge. Crease and unfold.

Step 4

Turn the square over and position it so that its points are facing up and down,

left and right.

Step 5

Bring the left point over to meet the right point. Crease and unfold.

Step 6

Bring the top point down to meet the bottom point. Crease and leave folded.

Step 7

Grasp the left and right points of the resulting triangle and push inward. The

model should collapse along the pre-existing folds. The result will be another triangle

shape that has one folded flap sticking out from the back of the model and another

sticking out from the front.

Step 8

Fold the front flap to the left and fold the back flap to the right so that your

model will lie flat.

The model will have one open end, which should be facing away from you."

Step 9

Next, grasp the left top corner of the triangle, top layer only, and fold it to the right and a little downwards, to meet its right edge, more or less at the halfway point.

Crease well and leave folded.

A new, smaller triangle will have formed on top of your original triangle. Make sure that, as far as possible, the bottom edge of your smaller triangle is in a horizontal position and straight in relation to the top of your larger triangle. 

Step 10

Repeat with the top right corner, but this time, tuck the point into the pocket that has been formed by your fold in the previous step.

To do this, open the left flap with one finger while grasping the right flap between your thumb and forefinger and sliding it into the pocket you are holding open as far as it will go.

Take your time with this step and don't be afraid to open the left flap wide enough so you can slide the right point securely into place.

Crease well.

Your model will now be a triangle consisting of 4 main areas: three separate triangles at the left, right and bottom, with a fourth area at the center, which you have just created by overlapping and tucking in of folds in steps 9 and 10.

Step 11

Turn the model over, like turning the page of a book, and repeat Steps 9 and 10, folding in the left and right points, so the sides of the model become cymmetrical.

You will now have a 5-sided  figure with a triangle at the bottom, and sides that slope inwards towards the flat, horizontal top edge of the model.

Step 12

Next, form a strong horizontal crease by folding the bottom triangle upwards and creasing well.

Unfold again.

Step 13

Turn over and fold the bottom triangle up in the same way again, then crease and unfold.

These last two steps will shape the bottom of your container.

Step 14

Pick up your model. One end of the model will be closed. Find the open end and create a small opening by inserting a fingertip inside the folds of the model.

While doing this, gently start to pull apart the sides of the model.

Remember your shape will have four sides, so feel free to turn it around in your hands if you encounter resistance when opening the container.

Some people help this process along by blowing forcefully into the open end to inflate the container, but it is optional for this model.

The bottom and sides of the container should start to move apart. Once you find the model has opened up into more or less the form of a pyramid, gently insert a finger to shape your container from the inside, pushing out the edges and corners as needed and shaping the sides and bottom creases from the outside.

Be careful not to press too hard from the inside, so as not to undo your hard work.

You should end up with your very own elegant pyramid-container.

Making origami accessible to visually impaired crafters through text instructions.

for non-commercial use only.

Compiled by Lindy van der Merwe, September 2014


 

MDL0039 - ORIGAMI - 2D LANTERN

MDL0039 - ORIGAMI - 2D LANTERN

Text-Only Instructions

Credits and Resources:

Instructions with supporting pictures and/or illustrations can be found at

http://www.origami-instructions.com/origami-lantern.html

It is likely that this model may also be found under different titles on various

sites elsewhere on the Internet with some minor variation on folding methods and

sequences.

Paper to be used: Square, any size; use large paper to practice with at first; 

note squares work very well for this model.

Folding level: Easy/Beginner

Steps: 11

Description: This is a flat model, resembling a lantern with a flat top and bottom and a diamond-shaped center part that could be described as a square with its sides jutting out on the left and right.

Remarks:

This is a fairly easy flat model, that is especially suitable to be used in scrap books, on cards or, if folded from small squares, as

embellishments in conjunction with other paper crafts or use string to hang as paper chain decorations.

Using origami or other colored paper will form an attractive pattern, making this lantern even more eye-catching.

If using two-sided origami paper, lay your paper with the patterned or colored side

down before starting to fold.

NOTE:  This model starts from the blintz base. If you are able to achieve this without instructions, do the following: Fold the blintz base once, turn over, fold the blintz base a second time and turn over once more, lastly fold the blintz base a third time and then go to step 9.

Step 1

Place a square piece of paper down on a hard, flat surface with its edges to the

left and right, top and bottom.

Step 2

Fold the left edge over to meet the right edge. Crease and unfold.

Step 3

Fold the top edge down to meet the bottom edge. Crease and unfold.

Step 4

Use the crease lines on your paper to fold all four corners in to meet at the center

of the square.

NOTE: This step May require some practice, because the folds should be straight and

equal to each other. Try out different ways of folding until you find what works

for you.

The best way I have found is to fold the top left and right points inwards to form

two top triangles. Turn the model 180 degrees and repeat this last step.

Make sure that, as far as possible, all outside corners are folded neatly at a 90

degree angle and that the crease lines all lie straight and meet precisely in the

center of the square.

It is fine to have very small "gap lines" between your triangles, but keep them straight

and as small as possible.

Step 5

Turn the model over.

Step 6

Position your paper once again as for Step 1 and then repeat Steps 2 to 4 with your folded square a second time.

You will be working with more layers of paper, so press down hard enough with your fingers to make strong creases. 

Step 7

Flip the paper over again.

Step 8

Repeat step 4 again, folding in the corners for one last time.

Step 9

Flip the paper over again and position it so one of the points are facing you or so it resembles a diamond shape.

Your square will have 4 triangular flaps, each comprising 2 smaller triangles, coming together at the center of the model.

Step 10

Focus on the point with the two triangular flaps furthest away from you. They will be positioned with their long edges towards each other, forming a vertical slit. Gently open the slit and press the two triangles away from you and towards the left and right edges of the model.

The triangles will open into a flat, rectangular area, that will be the top part of your lantern.

Step 11

Repeat the previous step on the two triangular flaps nearest you, pressing them towards you to flatten them. They will form the flat, bottom part of your lantern.

You should  end up with a pretty lantern of your very own.

Making origami accessible to visually impaired crafters through text instructions.

for non-commercial use only.

~`~Compiled by Lindy van der Merwe, November 2014



MDL0038 - ORIGAMI - FIVE-POINTED STAR (FROM A SQUARE)

MDL0038 - ORIGAMI - FIVE-POINTED STAR (FROM A SQUARE)

Text-Only Instructions

Credits and Resources:

Various Articles and videos describing this model can be found at sites like

http://www.youtube.com and http://www.ehow.com

For a good explanation with pictures, see http://www.dltk-kids.com/world/japan/morigamistar.htm

It is likely that this model may also be found under different titles on various sites elsewhere on the Internet with some minor variation on folding methods and

sequences.

Steps 1 to 9 have been adapted from http://www.essortment.com/make-origami-5-pointed-star-52524.html

Paper to be used: Square, any size; use large paper to practice with at first.

Folding level: Intermediate

Steps: 14

Description:  This is a flat, two-dimensional star, folded from one sheet of square paper. The folds and adjustments for creating the star is made on the backside of the model. When turned over, the front side shows 5 points that are cymmetrical. Tactually, the center part of the star resembles a large triangle with two arms poking out from behind on its left and right. There is a small ridge that can be felt at the left bottom tip of the model, as if the tip of the triangle has been cut off.

Remarks:

Stars are always beautiful to fold for many different occasions, including religious holidays and celebrations like the 4th of July in the U.S. or just for fun throughout the year.

Use colors like silver, gold, red, green or blue and tie with matching ribbon to hang the stars from a tree or around the house.

Use on cards or as decorations on gifts.

Make as a project for children and decorate with glitter, sequence or any other embellishments if preferred.

If you are using two-sided paper, make sure that the side you want for the front of the star is facing down before you start to fold.

"Step 1

Place a square of paper on your work surface and position it so that the edges

are facing up and down, left and right.

Step 2

Bring the top edge down to meet the bottom edge. Crease and unfold.

Step 3

Bring the left edge over to meet the right edge. Crease and unfold.

Step 4

Rotate the square so that it now resembles a diamond, with its points facing up and down, left and right.

Step 5

Bring the left point over to meet the right point. Crease and unfold.

Step 6

Bring the top point down to meet the bottom point. Crease and leave folded.

You will now have a triangular model pointing towards you. The longest, closed side will be facing away from you. You will notice three crease lines on your triangle. At the center there will be a vertical fold line with diagonal crease lines on the left and right of it.

You will be using the two diagonal crease lines as guidelines in the next step.

Step 7

Fold the model's top left edge down to meet the first diagonal crease line you come to. Crease well and leave folded.

You will now have a long, slender rectangular shape on the left edge of your model, with its point extending beyond the bottom left edge of the model.

Step 8

Turn the model over, like turning the page of a book, and repeat Step 7. 

The result will be another long triangular point which will look similar to the one folded in the previous step.

Step 9

If it is the first time you are making this model, it is strongly suggested that you apply a dab of glue to secure the long triangular shapes you have folded in the previous two steps. This will help a lot when you perform the next step.

Step 10

In this step you will be performing a kind of twisting of your paper. Lift up your model from your folding surface and grasp the bottom points at the center of your triangle between your thumbs and forefingers. Grasp the top layer of the paper with your left thumb and forefinger and the bottom layer with your right thumb and forefinger. First move your left hand up and your right hand down in order to open the model just slightly.

Then, gradually, move your hands apart and outward to the left and right as far as possible, letting the paper fold along the crease lines already created.  What will happen is that the points you have been holding between your fingers that were at the vertical center of the model will now start to rotate and sort of twist and they will eventually move apart and end up on the far left and right side of your model. The two long triangles that you have glued down will also have moved. They will now be situated at the center of the paper, one on the back and one on the front side of the model. The model as a whole will look like a large triangle with two legs sticking out from its bottom. These two legs will be the two bottom points of your five-point star while the top of the triangle is the top point of the star.

Step 11

Next, you will be creating the last two points of the star. Fold the right point of the model to the left as far as it will go and along the crease line that has already been created. You should now have a straight edge along the right side of your model.

Step 12

Take the point of the flap you have just folded and fold it back to the right again, but not all the way. Fold it back so it forms the fourth point of your star and so it lies more or less between the top point and the bottom right point of the star. You don't have a crease to guide you here, so just make a guess and make a strong crease when you have made your fold.

Step 13

Now perform the same two folds on the flap that is sticking out on the left of your model, thus creating the fifth point of the star. Check that your two left and right top points are cymmetrical as far as possible and that they are in line with the top point of the star.

Step 14

Finally, turn over your model and you should discover a cool five-pointed star, created from one square of paper.

Making origami accessible to visually impaired crafters through text instructions.

for non-commercial use only.

Compiled by Lindy van der Merwe, November 2014


 

MDL0037 - ORIGAMI - BULKY BOWL OR BOX

MDL0037 - ORIGAMI - BULKY BOWL OR BOX

Text-Only Instructions -

Credits and Resources:

These instructions were adapted from

http://www.ehow.com/how_2074661_make-origami-bowl.html

Also see

http://blog.greggman.com/blog/useful_origami/

Paper to be used: Rectangular, any size; use large paper, A4 will work well, to practice with at first.

Folding level: Intermediate

Steps: 12

Description: This is a fairly large, deep, open, square box or bowl with folded-over bands on two sides, forming two handles.

It will hold its shape fairly well, but is not sturdy enough to withstand continued use. It is easy to fold from memory and thus great if you need a container on the fly.

Remarks:

Make these bowls to co-ordinate with the colors of a party, especially if you want an easy clean-up.

They are also very useful when you are in need of a container in a flash, to hold left-overs or discarded shells, skins or bones after a meal, or for a quick lunch at the office.

These bowls can be stored flat and are great to use in the car or to take with when going for an outing.

A bowl folded from wax paper will even hold water for a short while.

Recycle by folding your bowls from old office paper or magazine pages.

Fold boxes from newspaper to use as seed trays or pots that can be placed directly in the ground and left to degrade with time.

Fold a box from newspaper to use around the kitchen when preparing food.  or to clean up after a meal. The box can then be placed, contents and all, in the trash or on the compost heap.

If using two-sided paper, lay your paper with the patterned or colored side

down before starting to fold.

The color or pattern will be visible on the outside of your box.

Step 1

Place a rectangular piece of paper down on a hard, flat surface, with the short edges at the top and bottom and the long edges at the left and right.

Step 2

Fold the bottom edge up to meet the top edge. Crease and leave folded.

Step 3

Fold the left edge over to meet the right edge. Crease and leave folded.

You will now have a rectangular model comprising 4 layers. 

Make sure that your new, smaller rectangle is once again positioned with the short edges at the top and bottom and that you are able to distinguish 4 separate layers of paper at the top right corner of the model.

Step 4

Next, grasp the bottom right corner of the rectangle, two top layers only, and fold it upwards and to the left to meet the left edge of the rectangle.

The bottom edge will come up to lie straight along the left vertical edge of the model. Crease well and unfold.

You will still have a rectangle, but now with a diagonal valley crease running from bottom left to the right edge of the model.

Step 5

Turn the model over and repeat on the other side, but in the opposite direction, folding the bottom left point of the model upwards to lie along the right vertical edge of the rectangle.

Crease and unfold.

The result will now be a rectangle, with a diagonal crease running from the bottom right corner to the left edge of the model.


NOTE: 

The creases just made in the previous two steps will help you complete steps 6 and 7 below.

Detailed instructions for performing Steps 6 and 7 can be found at the end of Step 12. Please refer to the detailed instructions if you need help

with these two steps.


Step 6

Turn the model over once again. You will be working with the two top layers only, so hold down the two bottom layers of your rectangle while doing this step.

Start to open the right side of the model by grasping the top right corner of the paper, top layer only, and pulling the paper you have lifted towards the left as far as it will go. 

The previous diagonal fold you made should allow the bottom of the model to open and spread out and form into a fairly large triangular shape. Press flat.

The right, top point of the model will move over to now form the left top point and the bottom edge will also move left, from a horizontal position into a vertical position.

Step 7

Turn over and repeat on the other side, but again in the opposite direction, pulling the left point of the paper you have lifted towards the right. 

The previous diagonal fold you made should allow the bottom of the model to open and spread out and form into the same triangular shape created in the previous step. Press flat.

Your model will now consist of a large bottom triangle, pointing towards you and two rectangular parts at the top, which should be divided at the vertical center of the model.

Make sure that the sides of your model are straight and are lying neatly on top of each other.

If you find this not to be the case, it is likely that your diagonal folds made in steps 4 and 5 were not sharp and similar enough. Open your paper and start over to make sure your diagonal folds are really sharp and similar.

After steps 6 and 7, check your sides again to make sure the model is cymmetrical.

Step 8

Next, fold the left side, top layer only, over to meet the right side of the model, like turning the pages of a book.

Press flat and leave folded.

Then, flip the paper over and do the same on the other side.

The surface of your model will now be smooth on both sides.

 Step 9

Fold both the far left and right top edges of the model, top layer only, inwards, so they meet at the center vertical crease line. Crease on both sides and leave folded.

Flip the paper over and repeat on the other side.

 After this step you should be able to distinguish the following 3 different parts of your model when it is lying flat on your folding surface.

At the top, two squares lying next to each other,  beneath them, two

triangles with one of their points touching each other at the center of the model, and, at the bottom, a larger diamond or rectangular-shaped part with

its point facing you.

The outside shape of the model will resemble an upsidedown house.

When your model is lying flat, the rectangles each have four layers of

paper,  the triangles each have eight layers of paper, and the big diamond at the bottom has four layers with a verticle fold dividing it in the middle.

Step 10

Locate the loose, horizontal flap at the top of the model and fold it downwards in half, and repeat this fold once or twice as far as the paper will allow.

Press flat and crease well.

Flip the paper over and repeat on the other side.

These last folds will create narrow strips of paper which will form the flat ears or handles on two sides of your bowl.

 Step 11

Now, fold the triangle at the bottom of the model up so its point reaches the top edge and crease well. Unfold.

Flip the model over and repeat on the other side.

These folds will form the square bottom of the bowl when it is opened, so make strong creases here.

Step 12

Pick up your model and hold it with the point facing away from you. While gently grasping the horizontal flaps on two sides of your bowl, insert your thumbs

into the pocket that has formed and pull gently to the sides.  The bowl should open into a fairly deep square shape with two handles on either side.

Reinforce the corners and press the bottom flat if necessary.

DETAILED INSTRUCTIONS FOR PERFORMING STEPS 6 AND 7

Make sure your model is once again positioned with the short sides at the

top and bottom with the diagonal valley crease running from the bottom left

corner to the right edge of the model.


a. Initial positioning of fingers and thumb:

On the right, bottom of your model, you will have 4 layers of paper forming two separate pockets that have been folded during previous steps.

You can slide your fingers into these pockets if you feel at the bottom right corner of the model.

Think of these two pockets as a top and bottom layer. The top layer or pocket is nearest you and the bottom layer is against your folding surface.

For step 6, the bottom pocket will stay flat on the folding surface and you will be working with the top pocket only.

You are not going to do a folding action, but rather a lifting and shifting of the paper and then, when it is at a certain point, you will be pressing

it flat into a triangular shape.

Place your right hand so it is resting on the bottom pocket, in between the

two pockets, actually. You are going to hold the bottom pocket in place. 

An idea might be to put something heavy in between your two pockets, so the bottom one stays put and then you have two hands to work with when doing

step 6.

Now you have the bottom pocket beneath your hand or the heavy object, and two single layers of paper or the top pocket to work with.

I will use the term "pocket" as the paper is made up of two layers that have been joined by a valley fold.

Slide one or two fingers of one hand just inside the pocket at the bottom right corner of your model. Your thumb should be placed right on the very

bottom of the model, on the horizontal fold. Hold the paper like this when you do the actual step. It is the grip you might use to turn the pages of a book and the action is similar as well.

Remember that you are working with the top pocket only and you are holding the bottom pocket flat on the table.

You are now ready to do the actual step. At this point the model still looks just like a 4 layered rectangle.

b.  Lifting and shifting

With your fingers and thumb holding the paper firmly, move your hand in an

upwards arc to the left, like you are turning the page of a book. Because you are holding your fingers inside what used to be a pocket, you

will notice that, as you start to lift the paper, the two layers of the

pocket are starting to move away from each other.

Keep moving your hand like you are going to turn the page of a book.

Stop the movement in mid-air when you think you have moved 90 degrees from your folding surface.

At this point, you will have a two-layered rectangle on the right, flat on the table and at a 90 degree angle, perpendicular to your folding surface,

you will have two flaps, hanging loose towards the left and right. 

It will sort of feel like a round pocket is starting to form near where you are still holding the paper and you will actually be able to place more

fingers straight down into the pocket as you are reaching 90 degrees.

Next, start to spread your fingers outward from where you are holding the

model in the air.

c.  Flattening

The final movement for this step is a flattening and spreading of the paper.

You will now move your hand and the paper away from yourself and towards the

table, thus flattening the paper into a triangle.

You will be moving in an arc forward and downward while still holding your paper.

The two loose points will sort of roll around as you flatten the paper and a triangle will form.

The diagonal fold you made in step 4 will help your paper to settle, forming the left and right diagonal sides of your triangle.

Don't be afraid to fiddle with the paper a little. If need be, flatten the paper on the inside of the large pocket that will be forming.

The creases for the left and right of your triangle are already there. It

might just be necessary to lend a helping hand for the paper to lie flat.

Another way to think of it, is that the crease you were holding with thumb and fingers, that was the horizontal bottom of the model has now moved into

a vertical position and the paper on both sides of this crease has spread

out to the left and right into the large pocket I have described.

Put another way, The horizontal crease is opened and rotated until it is vertical and then it is flattened again in a vertical position. At the same

time, the diagonal valley folds spread to the sides and when the step is

complete, the valley creases have become mountain creases, forming the left

and right sides of the large, wide triangle.

On the right side of your model you should still have the rectangle which you have been holding down. It has been undisturbed throughout this step. It

will be lifted and shifted in a similar manner when you turn the model over

in the next step.

For Step 7, follow the same directions as just described. After completing

Step 7, your model should be cymmetrical

Making origami accessible to visually impaired crafters through text instructions.

for non-commercial use only.

Compiled by Lindy van der Merwe, January 2011

Revised: October 2012 (with acknowledgement and thanks for help received from NFB Krafters Korner Origami list members - http://krafterskorner.org)

 

MDL0036 - ORIGAMI - 2-D FIR TREE

MDL0036 - ORIGAMI - 2-D FIR TREE

Text-Only Instructions

Credits and Resources:

This is a traditional model.

Various Articles with illustrations and videos describing this model can be found at sites like

http://www.youtube.com/

and 

http://www.ehow.com/

Paper to be used: Square, any size; use large paper to practice with at first.

Folding level: Easy/Beginner

Steps: 8

Description: This is a flat, two-dimensional model which resembles a fir tree with a narrow point at the top and widening on both sides into a rounded shape towards the base of the model.

The trunk is represented by a small rectangle just visible at the bottom of the tree.

Remarks:

This is a great project for children to do at Christmas time or for nature or Earth Day activities.

Fold trees from shiny white or green paper and decorate with markers, sequence, glitter etc.

Models can be glued onto cards or hung as decorations around the house or on the Christmas tree.

If preferred, use a dab of glue to secure the fold forming the trunk of the tree.


If you are using two-sided paper, make sure that the side you want for the outside of the tree is facing down before you start to fold.

"Step 1

Place a square piece of paper down on a hard, flat surface so that it forms a diamond shape, with the points facing up and down, left and right.

Step 2

Bring the left point over to meet the right point to form a vertical valley crease. Crease and unfold.

Step 3

Fold the left and right  corners a little downwards and inwards toward the center, aligning the edges with the vertical crease line you folded in the previous step.

Crease well on both sides and leave folded.

You will  have a kite-shaped piece of paper, with the long, narrow, folded part of the paper facing away from you and nearest you, the unfolded point of the paper that will become the trunk of the tree.

Step 4

To start forming the trunk of the tree, fold a small piece of the point of the kite shape that is nearest you, upwards, so that your model will now have a fairly short horizontal bottom edge.

Try to make the point as small as possible so you still have some paper to work with to make the trunk in the next steps.

Step 5

Next, still keeping the small tip folded, fold the bottom edge of your model upwards as far as it will go. 

You will now have a long, skinny triangle. At the bottom of the triangle you will have a shape with sloping sides and a flat top.

Step 6

Unfold the last fold, but not all the way. When unfolding, stop just before your paper is unfolded all the way and make a strong horizontal crease, squashing the paper between your thumbs and forefingers to form a horizontal fold line.

There will now be a horizontal ridge, separating the trunk from the actual tree.

The small tip you folded in Step 4 should be visible again, but it should still be folded over so your model will have a flat edge to form the bottom of the trunk.

Step 7

Now concentrate on the top part of your tree again. Still using the vertical valley crease at the center of the model as a guide, once again Fold the left and right  corners of your kite shape downwards and inwards toward the center, aligning the edges with the vertical crease line once more.

This fold is a repeat of the fold you made in Step 3. It serves to create the final, narrow shape of your tree.

Step 8

Turn your model over to reveal your very own fir tree with the small rectangular piece at the bottom representing the trunk and the tree itself, with the shape of the branches jutting out towards the sides and narrowing towards the top.

Making origami accessible to visually impaired crafters through text instructions.

for non-commercial use only.

Compiled by Lindy van der Merwe, August 2014

Revised: August 2015, with thankful acknowledgment to members of the NFB Krafter's Korner at http://www.krafterskorner.org


 

MDL0035 - ORIGAMI - 3-D FIR TREE

MDL0035 - ORIGAMI - 3-D FIR TREE

Text-Only Instructions

Credits and Resources:

Various Articles with illustrations and videos describing this model can be found at sites like

http://www.youtube.com/

and 

http://www.ehow.com/

Although the fir tree can be folded in different ways, the waterbomb or balloon base has been chosen and adapted for this model from

http://www.essortment.com/

Paper to be used: Square, any size; use large paper to practice with at first.

Folding level: Intermediate

Steps: 8

Description: This is a three-dimensional model which resembles a fir tree with a narrow point at the top and four branches, widening towards the base of the model.

This model is created by folding one of the well-known origami bases, the waterbomb or balloon base.

Remarks:

This is a great project for children and one that many adults might still remember from their childhood days.

Fold trees from shiny white or green paper and decorate with markers, sequence, glitter etc.

Models can be placed on flat surfaces or hung around the house or on the Christmas tree.

Use a large tree as a centerpiece or smaller ones as place cards on a table.

If you are using two-sided paper, make sure that the side you want for the outside

of the tree is facing up before you start to fold.

"Step 1

Place a square of paper on your work surface and position it so that the edges are facing up and down, left and right.

Step 2

Bring the top edge down to meet the bottom edge. Crease and unfold.

Step 3

Bring the left edge over to meet the right edge. Crease and unfold.

Step 4

Turn the square over and position it so that its points are facing up and down, left and right.

Step 5

Bring the left point over to meet the right point. Crease and unfold.

Step 6

Bring the top point down to meet the bottom point. Crease and leave folded.

Step 7

Grasp the left and right points of the resulting triangle and push inward. The model should collapse along the pre-existing folds. The result will be another triangle shape that has one folded flap sticking out from the back of the model and another sticking out from the front.

Step 8

Place your fir tree down on a flat surface and arrange its flaps to face in four different directions or hang around the house or on your Christmas tree.

Making origami accessible to visually impaired crafters through text instructions.

for non-commercial use only.

Compiled by Lindy van der Merwe, August 2014


 

MDL0034 - ORIGAMI - 3D SAILBOAT

MDL0034 - ORIGAMI - 3D SAILBOAT

Text-Only Instructions

Credits and Resources:

This is a traditional model.

Instructions for this model can be found at

http://www.ehow.com/how_6367298_instructions-make-paper-boat.html

and on various sites elsewhere on the Internet with some minor variation on folding methods and sequences.

Paper to be used: Rectangular, any size; use large paper to practice with at first.

Folding level: Intermediate

Steps: 12

Description: This is a three-dimensional sailboat. It has a distinct open, rounded boat shape with a triangular point rising from its center, representing the sails.

Remarks:

From the resource page mentioned above, comes this very apt quote by the contributor, David Weinberg: "

The paper boat is one of the most pleasing origami forms. Throughout its creation, the paper remains entirely dissimilar from a boat in form. Finally, in the last step, we pull apart our paper to reveal an elegant sailboat."

Like with many origami creations, the final model remain hidden and mysterious, until the very last step.

If using two-sided paper, lay your paper with the patterned or colored side down before starting to fold.

Step 1

Place a rectangular piece of paper down on a hard, flat surface, with the short edges

at the top and bottom and the long edges facing left and right.

Step 2

Fold the top edge down to meet the bottom edge. Crease and leave folded.

Step 3

Fold the left edge over to meet the right edge. Crease and unfold.

Step 4

Fold the two top corners downwards toward the center, aligning the edges with the vertical crease line you folded in Step 3.

Crease well and leave folded.

Your model should now resemble a triangle sitting atop a two-layered rectangle.

Step 5

Now, fold the bottom edge of the model, top layer only, up as far as it will go. It will cover the bottom edges of the triangular flaps you have just created, forming what might resemble the brim of a hat.

Crease and leave folded.

Step 6

Fold the corners at the top of the horizontal band diagonally, away from you, and tuck them in around the back of the triangle so all the edges of your model are straight.

Step 7

Turn the model over and repeat Step 5, to form another horizontal band, but do not fold back the corners of the band this time.

Step 8

At this point, your paper should resemble a hat. Pick up the paper from your folding surface.

Gently insert your thumbs into the hat shape and pull outward until you've flattened your paper into a square.

Step 9

Set the square down like a diamond with the separated part at the bottom. 

Fold the bottom point of the diamond, top layer only, up to reach its top point.

Crease and leave folded.

Step 10

Turn the model over and repeat step 9 on the other side.

You will be left with another smaller hat-shaped model, but without a brim this time.

Step 11

Using the same motion as in Step 8, pull the hat into a square again and  set it down as a diamond once more, with the open end nearest you.

Step 12

Pick up the model and pull the top of the diamond gently apart to the left and right. Your model will instantly transform into a three-dimensional sailboat.

Making origami accessible to visually impaired crafters through text instructions.

for non-commercial use only.

Compiled by Lindy van der Merwe, May 2014